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 Hotel Ireland  Home   Information by County:    A   C   D   G   K   L   M   O   R   S   T   W 

  


Laios "Queen's County, a county of Ireland, bounded N and W by King's county, E by Kildare and part of Carlow, S by Kilkenny, and SW by Tipperary, 32 English m. long, and as many broad. Along the W boundary runs a range of high and steep mountains, and in the E the Dysart hills form a prominent and picturesque object. The lands have been thus distributed - Arable land, pasture, and meadow: 210,000 acres; Woods and plantations: 1,300 acres; Bog, mountain, and waste: 21,000 acres; Roads: 2,000 acres; Total area: 235,300 acres. Principle rivers, the Barrow and Nore. Chief towns, Maryborough, Portarlington, and Stradbelly. Almost every description of soil is found in this county, from very stiff clay, to a light but fertile sandy loam. The principal mineral productions are coal and limestone. Pop. 90,000."

Limerick "Limerick, a county of Ireland, province of Munster, bounded N by the Shannon which separates it from Clare, S by Cork, NE and E by Tipperary, and W by Kerry, 51 m. long and 32 broad. The surface of this county, though diversified by small hills, is not, generally speaking, mountainous, excepting on the SE, where it is bounded by the Galtees, a lofty ridge which extends into Tipperary, and on the borders of Kerry, where the land rises, and forms a grand amphitheatre of low but steep mountains, which extend in a wide area from Loghill to Drumcolloher. The land is generally fertile. The principal rivers are the Maig, Feale, Gale, and Blackwater. The climate is wet. Pop. 214,286."
[From The New London Gazetteer (1826)]

Longford "Longford, a county of Ireland, bounded W by Roscommon, N by Leitrim and Cavan, and E and S by W. Meath, 25 m. long N to S, and 24 E to W, containing 366 square m. The soil is generally fruitful, though much interspersed with bogs. mountains, morasses, and fens. The Shannon forms the W boundary; other principal rivers are the Inny, Camlin, and Fallen. Lough Gawnagh is its most considerable collection of fresh water. Pop.10,702."

Louth "Louth, a county of Ireland, bounded S and SW by E. Meath, W by Monaghan and Cavan, N by Armagh, NE by the bay of Carlingford, and E by the Irish channel, 27 m. long, and 18 broad. It is in general rich and well cultivated, and has little waste ground. Chief river, the Boyne. Principal towns, Carlingford, Dundalk, Drogheda, and Colton. The linen manufacture is carried on to a great extent. Pop. 107,070."

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